Totoy Guro

16 thoughts on “Totoy Guro

  1. Aloha Totoy,
    The passion you express when you talk about your students is fantastic.
    I am a visual arts teacher on Maui, Hawaii. I am leaving my teaching jobs to travel in Southeast Asia for the next year… but instead of leaving behind what I love doing, I’m looking for ways to bring it with me.
    I have decided to find a way to teach an art class in every country I visit (even if it’s just one-one hour class.) The Philippines are our first stop–this April!
    I saw your blog, and I thought I’d send you a note.

    One thing I’m excellent at is creating exciting visual arts lessons that cover material in their standard curriculum. (I just finished a project with 2nd graders learning about the coral reef and ecology by creating two collage murals, for instance.) Arts integration is one of my specialties.

    Visiting a classroom and creating a short project with students would be wonderful for all involved. Of course, I understand a school can’t let just any person visit its classrooms–but perhaps you have some ideas on how I could do this? Or perhaps there is a project your own students would love to do?

    My art-teaching blog is http://www.mustartnow.com. My own art is at http://www.sutrovgallery.typepad.com.

    I’d love to hear your ideas.

    • Hi!

      I would love to invite you to my own classroom; unfortunately, April is the children’s summer break. But there are summer class programs where you can share your expertise. In fact, you can email one of the professors in our University (University of the Philippines where I work as in instructor in the laboratory school) whose department holds annual teacher training with Art as one of the topics of discussion. Here is her email address.

      Dr. Felicitas E. Pado
      felypado@yahoo.com
      University of the Philippine, College of Education

      Thanks for your link!

  2. Every year, the Bato Balani Foundation awards exemplary teachers in its program called The Many Faces of the Teacher.

    The Many Faces of the Teacher is an advocacy campaign aimed to extol the virtues of teaching by providing role models who can inspire excellence. It recognizes leaders in the teaching profession as examples of true heroes who can be a source of inspiration and knowledge for their fellow teachers and students.

    It recognizes Filipino teachers who play a significant role in the life of a student, nurture and mold the character of future leaders and heroes, hence, becoming a force that shapes this nation. It upholds the leaders who happen to be teachers, an inspiration to many not only with their achievements but in the way they live their lives and dedicate themselves to the vocation.

    We are starting the search for this year’s honorees. We are hoping you can help us promote this advocacy by writing about the search in your blog.

    Pls see this link for the stories of our last year’s honorees.

    http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=615432&publicationSubCategoryId=90

    Past awardees include the Bernido couple (also Magsaysay awardees), Fr. James Reuter, mobile teacher Jenelyn Baylon, Batibot’s Feny delos Reyes, Onofre Pagsanjan, etc. More details are available at http://www.tributetoteachers.batobalani.com/global/. Attached also is our poster for your use.

  3. Hello there.

    I really admire your blog and your dedication. I’m currently working with PLAY Pilipinas, a social enterprise dedicated to the integral role of play-time in child development. We’re currently in the forefront of the advocacy in the country, and we want to start a groundswell, if you will, by spreading the word out to child educators and parents alike. Can I invite you to talk about the advocacy?

    This is PLAY’s website: http://www.playpilipinas.org
    If you have the time, you can also reach me through my email address.

  4. School is our children’s second home—and parents are more confident of enrolling their children to a particular educational institution when they know the caliber of the individual running it. This makes the role of the school principal such a crucial one. Not only does he have to manage the school’s everyday affairs excellently, he also has to foster academic excellence, promote discipline, and inspire positive action among students and faculty. This is the kind of principal that deserves to be honored.

    The Leadership Strategies for School Managers (LESSM) program has launched the 1st National Search for The Outstanding Principals (TOP) with the objective of recognizing individuals who have made a significant positive impact on the lives of students, teachers, and the community.

    Nominations are now open for the 1st National Search for The Outstanding Principals in five aspects of school management: instructional leadership, school management, mentoring, client relations, and community involvement.

    Nominations have been extended until November 15, 2012. Winners will be selected by December 15, 2012, and awarded on January 2013. For more information, go to http://www.lessm.ahead.edu.ph/national-search-for-outstanding-school-managers/

  5. Hello po, Sir ^_^ I am supposed to be writing a paper on the role of pop culture in national storytelling, but for my arguments to be compelling I need to know what NATIONAL STORYTELLING is.. even more so Filipino/Philippine National Storytelling. I’ve been having trouble looking for materials which address my concern along the conceptual level and I’ve tried looking online as well. The next valid thing I could think of is to consult professionals. Is there a working definition for national storytelling as well as criteria of what would constitute this?

    Thank you so much po for your time!

    • hey you know I cant answer that actually. The term national in itself is problematic as it is hard to define what national is.

      On the otherhand, I think “national storytelling” for your paper means how the country shapes society and how pop culture helps shape what our nation is all about
      🙂

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